Live results from #MedwayElects19: General Election edition

The polls have closed in today’s General Election, and we are settled in at Medway Park for the count. We’ll be bringing you the results as they come in throughout the night.

For up to the minute coverage, we recommend you follow us on Twitter. The latest tweets are embedded below, but if you click through to Twitter you’ll be able to see everything.

Results will unfortunately take some time, with the count to set to conclude around 6am. It’ll be a long night, so feel free to buy us a coffee.

Live results

Chatham and Aylesford
Tracey Crouch (Con): 28,856
Vince Maple (Lab): 10,316
Dave Naghi (Lib Dem): 2,866
Geoff Wilkinson (Green): 1,090
John Gibson (CPA): 212

Gillingham and Rainham
Rehman Chishti (Con): 28,173
Andy Stamp (Lab): 13,064
Alan Bullion (Lib Dem): 2,503
George Salomon (Green): 1,043
Rob McCulloch Martin (UKIP): 837
Peter Cook (Ind): 229
Roger Peacock (CPA): 119

Rochester and Strood
Kelly Tolhurst (Con): 31,151
Teresa Murray (Lab): 14,079
Graham Colley (Lib Dem): 3,717
Sonia Hyner (Green): 1,312
Roy Freshwater (UKIP): 1,080
Chris Spalding (Ind): 587

#MedwayElects19: General Election edition is today!

It is General Election day across the country, but most importantly for us, here in Medway.

Across the authority, voters have the chance to elect the three MPs that will represent us in Parliament for the next five four three two however many years until we do this again.

Polling stations are now open and remain open until 10pm.

If you have received your polling card, you will know where you need to go to vote. If you are registered to vote but have not received your card, you do not need it to vote. Just go to your polling station, confirm your name and address, and you will be allowed to vote. No ID is required.

If you do not know the location of your polling station, you can call Medway Council on 01634 332030 and they will tell you where to go.

If you have a postal vote, but did not remember to return it in time, you can drop it in to your polling station up until polls close at 10pm.

You may find people outside of your polling station who ask to see your polling card. These people are activists for political parties and you absolutely do not have to engage with them.

To find a list of your candidates, Medway Elects have a handy tool where you enter your postcode and it brings up their details.

Once the polls close at 10pm, we will begin our #MedwayElects19 coverage through the night as the results come in, so be sure to check back later for that.

Where do our candidates stand on animal welfare?

In which Mina da Rui quizzes our Medway parliamentary candidates on animal welfare issues, and analyses their responses..

Instead of our regular style of iFAQ, we’ve tried something a little different this week. There’s plenty of interesting subjects we know little about, and unlike Michael Gove, we are now sick of experts. As such, every now and again, we’re going to ask people who know particular subjects to pose questions to our politicians and analyse their responses. For this first edition, we invited Mina da Rui, former Animal Welfare Party candidate, to pose questions to our Medway parliamentary candidates on, well, animal welfare issues. Their responses, along with Mina’s analysis are below..

Continue reading “Where do our candidates stand on animal welfare?”

Party or candidate, leader or policies?

In which Caitlin Webb tries to work through all of the different factors that go in to casting a vote at a General Election..

This has been called the most important vote in a lifetime, sound familiar? Feels like every time we go to the polling station, it’s to make a do-or-die decision. So deciding who to vote for is pretty important. There’s also the fact that people who have been living in this country for decades, people who have been cheated by the judicial system and 17-year-olds can’t vote, that drives me to put a cross in the box. But who will win my vote?

Continue reading “Party or candidate, leader or policies?”

Political Figures Predictions: Rochester and Strood

In which Alan Collins from Medway Elects looks at the third and final Medway constituency, Rochester and Strood, to see what the future may bring..

It’s November. It’s cold. And there’s another election looming. I have fired up my data projection model and already analysed the potential results in Chatham and Aylesford and Gillingham and Rainham. Now as I conclude this series it’s time to take a look at Medway’s third, and arguably most volatile, constituency. 

Continue reading “Political Figures Predictions: Rochester and Strood”

Political Figures Predictions: Gillingham and Rainham

In which Alan Collins from Medway Elects takes a look at what the General Election what might bring for Gillingham and Rainham..

They say that a week is a long time in politics, and in the time since my analysis for Chatham and Aylesford was published, the Brexit party have announced that they will not be standing in any seat won by the Conservatives in 2017. That means their three candidates in Medway have been stood down (whether they like it or not). 

This not only impacts on the projection which has already been published, but also on the remaining projections. The question is, how does one divide the projected vote share for the Brexit Party between the remaining parties? Contrary to prevailing belief, the Brexit party were not likely to just be a vote drain on the Conservatives. 

Continue reading “Political Figures Predictions: Gillingham and Rainham”

Political Figures Predictions: Chatham and Aylesford

In which Alan Collins from Medway Elects takes a look at what the General Election what might bring for Chatham and Aylesford..

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. No, not Christmas, but the one where almost everyone in Medway with access to the internet seems to cry out for change, only for the Conservatives to be re-elected by a wide margin.

So for this series of articles, Messrs Jennings and Keevil have asked their resident data nerd to run the numbers and try to predict, on the numbers alone, whether that mythical change might happen, or whether we will wake up on 13 December to the news that the three Conservative candidates have been re-elected.

To answer that question I shall be taking a look at what the data from the 2015 general election tells us about what might happen next month. No, I’ve not forgotten that we also voted in 2017. However, the election in 2015 presents an extra set of data which is infinitely more useful in comparing how the attitudes of Medway’s voters has shifted: the local elections. I shall, therefore, be taking a look at how the results in each ward for Medway’s three constituencies changed between 2015 and 2019, and using that to try and determine whether any of our three MPs are likely to be queuing up outside a job centre on 13 December.

I have form for this. A comparison of the shift in local election behaviour was one of the key principles behind the data model I produced in 2010 which, as I explained at the beginning of the year on this very website, was remarkably accurate. Whilst I have created a similar model for this year, it comes with its own caveat: there are additional parameters to account for both the 2015 and 2017 general elections, so essentially there is more data to go wrong in the projections that have been generated for each constituency. Just to fill you all with confidence…

That said, these have only ever been projections, not predictions, and the usual caveat that they are only a snapshot of where support likely sits, not a demonstrative prediction of what the vote will actually be, applies.

Continue reading “Political Figures Predictions: Chatham and Aylesford”

5 weeks of imperfect balance

In which Caitlin Webb, the UK’s first Local Democracy Reporter, explains to us what purdah is, and how much it impacts an election campaign..

There’s a general election coming. There’s nothing more exciting for a political journalist. It’s where politics gets all serious and things could be really shaken up. We have now entered purdah, the pre-election period.

What is purdah and why is it so important? 

Continue reading “5 weeks of imperfect balance”

It never ends: General Election set for 12 December

Once more unto the breach, dear friends.

After seeming imminent for about a year now, the House of Commons today voted to move forward with a General Election on 12 December in attempt to break the current parliamentary deadlock.

Of course, we’ll be providing full coverage of this election from the Medway perspective in the coming weeks.

For now, we’d like to remind you to ensure that you are registered to vote. Under the current system, you need to register again each time you move, so please check now that you are properly registered even if you think that you are.

So far, the majority of local political parties have so far selected their candidates for this election. Assuming all three Conservative MPs seek re-election, we also have confirmed Liberal Democrat and Brexit Party candidates. So far, Labour is the only main party to not offer any candidates, despite being the main opposition party in Medway.

This election will be the eighth time Medway has gone to the polls since we started this stupid website less than five years ago, so strap in and follow along. It’s going to be a long six weeks.